Expository Exegesis of Examples Enlightens the Apocalyptic Address

Micah, chapter 4

And it will come about in the last days That the mountain of the house of the LORD Will be established as the chief of the mountains. It will be raised above the hills, And the peoples will stream to it. And many nations will come and say, “Come and let us go up to the mountain of the LORD And to the house of the God of Jacob, That He may teach us about His ways And that we may walk in His paths.” For from Zion will go forth the law, Even the word of the LORD from Jerusalem. And He will judge between many peoples And render decisions for mighty, distant nations. Then they will hammer their swords into plowshares And their spears into pruning hooks; Nation will not lift up sword against nation, And never again will they train for war. And each of them will sit under his vine And under his fig tree, With no one to make them afraid, For the mouth of the LORD of hosts has spoken. Though all the peoples walk Each in the name of his god, As for us, we will walk In the name of the LORD our God forever and ever.  “In that day,” declares the LORD, “I will assemble the lame, And gather the outcasts, Even those whom I have afflicted. I will make the lame a remnant, And the outcasts a strong nation, And the LORD will reign over them in Mount Zion From now on and forever. And as for you, tower of the flock, Hill of the daughter of Zion, To you it will come— Even the former dominion will come, The kingdom of the daughter of Jerusalem. Now, why do you cry out loudly? Is there no king among you, Or has your counselor perished, That agony has gripped you like a woman in childbirth? Writhe and labor to give birth, Daughter of Zion, Like a woman in childbirth, For now you will go out of the city, Dwell in the field, And go to Babylon. There you will be rescued; There the LORD will redeem you From the hand of your enemies. And now many nations have been assembled against you Who say, ‘Let her be polluted, And let our eyes gloat over Zion.’ But they do not know the thoughts of the LORD, And they do not understand His purpose; For He has gathered them like sheaves to the threshing floor. Arise and thresh, daughter of Zion, For your horn I will make iron And your hoofs I will make bronze, That you may pulverize many peoples, That you may devote to the LORD their unjust gain And their wealth to the Lord of all the earth.

Most pastors and preachers, theologians and teachers believe that this is a prophecy of the millenial kingdom. Problem; There is no mention of the duration of the reign of the Lord that is 1000 years but rather, “forever and ever.” This, in and of itself is absolute proof that this isn’t a millennial kingdom. Yet there’s a another problem, a contradiction to claims constantly made by the dogmatic dispensationalists. We take a long view and consider the context, aspirations of the author, genre, examples and divide rightly. If one were to ask any of the hundreds of dogmatic dispensationalist on television, radio, YouTube, social media or print, “are we in the last days?” invariably they would answer in the affirmative; almost always emphatically. Nevertheless, one doesn’t have to ask them if we are in the last days because they offer up their opinions without prompting and post it all over social media. Because the number of people, like myself is growing, who are writing and speaking out against their dubious dogma, they say, “we’re in the very last of the last days because Peter said that there would be mockers and scoffers.”

Not to be nitpicky but Peter didn’t say mockers and scoffers, he said one or the other depending on which translation one reads; the words are somewhat synonymous. Yet they combine translations for added effect. I am willing to wager, that at this point, they truly think that Peter actually said, “mockers and scoffers ” because they have repeated the phrase they made up so many times that it is tradition in their minds and therefore, Scripture. In the  same way as they do another idiomatic idea of this alleged millenial kingdom, “the lion will lay down with the lamb.” “But Russell P, that’s actually Scripture, and you call it an idiomatic idiom!” Yes, I use ridiculously redundant and utterly ironic intimations and alliteration in illustration of idioms. These things put out by prophecy pundits is nothing but sayings from our evangelical culture.  “Mockers and scoffers” and the “Lion laying with the lamb” are not verbatim quotes but a saying people use over and over, to a point which we think it is a Bible verse. We actually have many useful idioms, many of which I will utilize on a regular basis, such as, “the golden rule” but we have also an overabundance of idiomatic ideas that are not necessarily well grounded from Scripture. Almost every christian utilizes “Christianese,” or idioms that are a summation of Scripture. We have to look at the spirit of the idiom and the motives of the speaker. More importantly, we have to search the Scripture and see the sublime string and the Spirit of the word of God, the aspirations of the author and then the spirit of the idiomatic idea is exposed by expository exegesis of examples. Are you thoroughly confused yet? Whatch and you will see.

Ask the dogmatic dispensationalists if we are in the last days and you will get an immediate answer and an immediate idiom; Yes, because of the “mockers and scoffers.” You will also get another idiom; “the apostate church.” Let’s explore the examples of which they give. Let’s begin with the “apostate church.” Paul, writing a personal letter to Timothy: “Paul, an apostle of Christ Jesus by the will of God, according to the promise of life in Christ Jesus, to Timothy, my beloved son: Grace, mercy and peace from God the Father and Christ Jesus our Lord…But realize this, that in the last days difficult times will come. For men will be lovers of self, lovers of money, boastful, arrogant, revilers, disobedient to parents, ungrateful, unholy, unloving, irreconcilable, malicious gossips, without self-control, brutal, haters of good, treacherous, reckless, conceited, lovers of pleasure rather than lovers of God; holding to a form of godliness, although they have denied its power; and avoid such men as these. For among them are those who enter into households and captivate weak women weighed down with sins, led on by various impulses, always learning and never able to come to the knowledge of the truth. And just as Jannes and Jambres opposed Moses, so these men also oppose the truth, men of depraved mind, rejected as regards the faith. But they will not make further progress; for their folly will be obvious to all, as also that of those two came to be. But you followed my teaching, conduct, purpose, faith, patience, love, eperseverance, persecutions, and sufferings, such as happened to me at Antioch, at Iconium and at Lystra; what persecutions I endured, and out of them all the Lord delivered me! And indeed, all who desire to live godly in Christ Jesus will be persecuted. But evil men and impostors will proceed from bad to worse, deceiving and being deceived. You, however, continue in the things you have learned and become convinced of, knowing from whom you have learned them; and that from childhood you have known the sacred writings which are able to give you the wisdom that leads to salvation through faith which is in Christ Jesus.”

And Peter writes; “Know this first of all, that in the last days mockers will come with their mocking, following after their own lusts, and saying, ‘Where is the promise of His coming? For ever since the fathers fell asleep, all continues just as it was from the beginning of creation.’ For when they maintain this, it escapes their notice that by the word of God the heavens existed long ago and the earth was formed out of water and by water, through which the world at that time was destroyed, being flooded with water. But the present heavens and earth by His word are being reserved for fire, kept for the day of judgment and destruction of ungodly men. But do not let this one fact escape your notice, beloved, that with the Lord one day is as a thousand years, and a thousand years as one day. The Lord is not slow about His promise, as some count slowness, but is patient toward you, not wishing for any to perish but for all to come to repentance. But the day of the Lord will come like a thief, in which the heavens will pass away with a roar and the elements will be destroyed with intense heat, and the earth and its works will be burned up. Since all these things are to be destroyed in this way, what sort of people ought you to be in holy conduct and godliness, looking for and hastening the coming of the day of God, on account of which the heavens will be destroyed by burning, and the elements will melt with intense heat! But according to His promise we are looking for new heavens and a new earth.”

Paul was clearly writing to Timothy so that he, himself, would be on guard and Peter wrote to the early church; that’s the context. Nevertheless we rip verses out of context and then add our own words making idiomatic ideas. Then they are repeated and people follow the idiomatic idea and not the intent or aspirations of the author. We are like sheep and follow the idiomatic ideas of our pastors and preachers, theologians and teachers. Unless  you are learning for yourself, you only know what you have been taught. We are sheep with shepherds like Micah chapter three, and 2 Timothy 3–I wrote “like.” That is, yes, we take a long view and an idealistic approach but also understand that context is king. We are sheep, we follow– 20200313_204436one person stocked up on toilet paper because of the Coronavirus and someone else saw it–they then stocked up. Others took note and they stocked up as well. Within hours, the media saw the masses making a run on toilet paper and reported it and now our stores’ shelves are bare–we are sheep. It’s the same way with twisted Scripture. We don’t read the Bible for all its worth and appoint and pay people to tell us what we want to hear, listening to their idiomatic ideas. “Look, that guy’s stocking up on toilet paper, we should too!” We never ask why, we simply follow the leader.

However, it gets much, much worse. The prophecy pundits and dogmatic dispensationalists argue that we are in the last days based upon their interpretation of Paul and Peter’s words, even though they were written to early Christians, prior to 70 AD. To them, the Coronavirus is a sign that we are in the last hour of the last days because everything gets really bad in the last days (Did the doomsday clock move?). But before it gets extremely bad, the church is raptured. It is odd that neither Paul nor Peter tell this to their audience concerning the last days.

Concerning the “last days,” notice; “Know this first of all, that in the last days mockers will come with their mocking, following after their own lusts, and saying, ‘Where is the promise of His coming?'” That’s pretty bad. Paul also writes similarly; “But realize this, that in the last days difficult times will come.” That is not good either. Truly, both Peter and Paul describe the last days as times of trouble. The last days, we are told, will be bad, very bad and then the rapture happens which will cause chaos and calamity on earth. We are told by the prophecy pundits that we are in the last days because of wars, rumors of wars, earthquakes, locusts and the Coronavirus. But how do they explain this?

“And it will come about in the last days That the mountain of the house of the LORD Will be established as the chief of the mountains. It will be raised above the hills, And the peoples will stream to it. And many nations will come and say, ‘Come and let us go up to the mountain of the LORD And to the house of the God of Jacob, That He may teach us about His ways And that we may walk in His paths.’ For from Zion will go forth the law, Even the word of the LORD from Jerusalem. And He will judge between many peoples And render decisions for mighty, distant nations. Then they will hammer their swords into plowshares And their spears into pruning hooks; Nation will not lift up sword against nation, And never again will they train for war. And each of them will sit under his vine And under his fig tree, With no one to make them afraid, For the mouth of the LORD of hosts has spoken.

Micah’s contemporary, Isaiah also writes; “Now it will come about that In the last days, The mountain of the house of the LORD Will be established as the chief of the mountains, And will be raised above the hills; And all the nations will stream to it. And many peoples will come and say, ‘Come, let us go up to the mountain of the LORD, To the house of the God of Jacob; That He may teach us concerning His ways, And that we may walk in His paths.’ For the law will go forth from Zion, And the word of the LORD from Jerusalem. And He will judge between the nations, And will render decisions for many peoples; And they will hammer their swords into plowshares, and their spears into pruning hooks. Nation will not lift up sword against nation, And never again will they learn war.”

Simple solution: those are not the same “last days.” But if this is the case, how do we distinguish and differentiate, define and defend our views on the last days? Which last days and when? How do we know that we are not in the last days of Isaiah and Micah but are in the last days of Paul and Peter? Do we look at the Coronavirus and interpret the Bible or do we look at the Coronavirus and interpret the Bible? You read that correctly because one’s beliefs about the last days will interpret the Coronavirus into pestilence and famine or opportunity for God’s people to explain the workings of God. Some will see both. But we don’t look out our windows, seeing a rather tame-pestilence compared to the Spanish Flu or the Bubonic Plague and say that this is the beginning of birth pangs. That is utterly ridiculous. There is only one way to interpret the Bible and it’s not by looking at the headlines or out one’s window but by the Bible. We have to let the Bible interpret the Bible by considering the context, aspirations of author, genre, examples and then divide rightly the word of truth. Then, and only then, should we look at history and current culture. In so doing we will see that Paul was literally warning Timothy, preparing him specifically for the last days. Then we see the Black Plague and the Protestant Reformation and realize that history confirms the Biblical account. We cannot be seeing the beginning of birth pangs because we live in much better times than those under the rule of a corrupted church and those living and dying in a plague that killed half the population of Europe. But these are only two instances of life being better now. Cholera, Influenza, and the like, have wreaked havoc throughout history. The church in Ephesus left her first love, the church in Thyatira tolerated Jezebel, Sardis was dead and even the Corinthians were getting drunk at communion while others went without.

Nevertheless, none of this counts as birth pangs, according to dispensationalist dogma, because the prophetic clock stopped when the Messiah was “cut off.” The parable of the fig tree, itself an apocalyptic address, tells the dogmatic dispensationalists that the prophetic clock started again in 1948 with the rebirth of Israel as a nation. Whereas the Bubonic Plague was in the “stopped” period, the Coronavirus is in the “restarted” period. Therefore, according to their dogma, the Coronavirus is a birth pang, of which, all increase. Problems; the fig tree was literally cursed by Jesus to never again bear fruit so that is speculation; and then, there has been Influenza, HIV, and Ebola. The jury is still out on which is worse.

We are sheep, yet President Trump made the right decision in working with many people from pharmaceutical companies and other organizations to come up with a plan to combat the Coronavirus before he made any promises to the American people. Politically however, that was a mistake because we are sheep and would rather be lied to than have a solid solution first. Again, toilet paper? We panicked because we only had other sheep to follow. This is looking out our windows and seeing what is not. Again, toilet paper? Do you know what you can still find on store shelves? Vitamin C and Zinc vitamins. The president and his colleagues were working behind the scenes to come up with testing sites, test kits, plans, alleviating laws that hinder treatment and the like. But because he didn’t immediately say all of this we panicked and bought up all the available toilet paper. Yet he did the right thing by not making false promises that are unconfirmed. This is why we start with the Scripture and consider the context, while the prophecy pundits start with the idiomatic ideas, placing the proverbial cart before the idiomatic horse. My biggest hope in all of this is that those with an abundance of toilet paper will share with those unable to buy some because of the former’s stockpiling.

Since 1948, the alleged time of the prophetic clock restarting, there have been three, global pandemics. If the Coronavirus ends up paling in comparison, what then? Not only that, but also this; how do we measure pestilence? Death, sickness, economic fallout, or panic? One can manipulate any data to confirm their idiomatic ideas. Here’s a fun fact about an idiomatic idea. Global warming has caused a warming trend in the United States. Except that it hasn’t, accept that it hasn’t. But global warming pundits are smart, so that when they saw a cooling period they changed the idiomatic “global warming” to “climate change.” It’s absolutely brilliant because climates do change. In the same way the prophecy pundits use “the last days” to cover anything that could possibly happen on earth. War; we actually live in relative peace but as always there are wars, therefore we’re in the last days. Smartphones give us the ability to spread the gospel to the globe while guarding our toilet paper but also pay bills without cash, therefore we’re in the last days. I could go on and on but I think we get the point. They place the idiomatic idea of the last days, as defined by themselves, over an expository exegesis of the last days and the Biblical use of the phrase which can only be defined by the context. As we have seen, “the last days” often look very different in Scripture. Let’s look at one more example.

In Hebrews we read; “God, after He spoke long ago to the fathers in the prophets in many portions and in many ways, in these last days has spoken to us in His Son, whom He appointed heir of all things, through whom also He made the world. And He is the radiance of His glory and the exact representation of His nature, and upholds all things by the word of His power. When He had made purification of sins, He sat down at the right hand of the Majesty on high; having become as much better than the angels, as He has inherited a more excellent name than they.” The context of “last days” in the New Testament is clear. Paul wrote to Timothy on how to prepare for them, Peter wrote to the early church to remind them of what was expected of them and what was coming to them. Quite ironically, as we segway back into the millenial kingdom, we notice that the dogmatic dispensationalists argue that the kingdom is a literal thousand years but Peter writes; “that with the Lord one day is as a thousand years, and a thousand years as one day.” This is the favorite passage of the dogmatic dispensationalists to point to the idiomatic “lateness of the hour,” yet in it we also find that one thousand is not always literal.

In an absolute fact, the millenial kingdom is itself an idiomatic idea and not arrived from an apocalyptic address. Let me put that plainly, “the rapture,” and “the millenial kingdom” are words men have used to describe their understanding of Scripture but are not actually found in Scripture. The dogmatic dispensationalists love to debate this, saying, “you know what else isn’t found in the Bible, the trinity.” It would be at this point that I would carefully consider what I was defending and how I sounded, but undaunted they continue; “You know what else isn’t found in the Bible, the Bible.” At the risk of sounding condescending, that is a fourth grade argument. These are smart people, much smarter than I am but they’ve fallen for an idiomatic idea and not expository exegesis. They pick and choose pieces of verses, like the mega-church pastors, placing the emphasis on the idiomatic idea rather than taking a long view of Scripture. I don’t agree fully with those that hold to an amillennial approach to eschatology but love their boldness in saying, a-millennial; no millennial. Nevertheless they do believe in the kingdom but not one of a literal thousand years. Ironically, if I were to say this in front of the school of which I attended or in the churches of which I served, or in the churches I visit overseas, I would be thought of as accursed, a heretic and certainly a scoffer. “There is clearly a literal millenial kingdom in the Bible,” most would say. Except that there isn’t, accept that there isn’t. “The Millenial Kingdom” is an idiomatic idea invented by men; the trinity is not and the Bible is not. In other words, one cannot find a verse in the Bible which states a millenial kingdom. One sees the trinity from the beginning and Bible simply means “book.” A book is an item that contains words or images. Let’s read the book which has two parts, the Old and the New and the latter writers were familiar with the former writers and both were inspired by the Spirit.

Paul states; “realize this, that in the last days difficult times will come.” Peter wrote, “in the last days mockers will come with their mocking, following after their own lusts.” The author of Hebrews exclaims; “[God], in these last days has spoken to us in His Son, whom He appointed heir of all things.” In Micah we read; “And it will come about in the last days That the mountain of the house of the LORD Will be established as the chief of the mountains. It will be raised above the hills, And the peoples will stream to it. And many nations will come and say, ‘Come and let us go up to the mountain of the LORD And to the house of the God of Jacob, That He may teach us about His ways And that we may walk in His paths.’ For from Zion will go forth the law, Even the word of the LORD from Jerusalem. And He will judge between many peoples And render decisions for mighty, distant nations. Then they will hammer their swords into plowshares And their spears into pruning hooks; Nation will not lift up sword against nation, And never again will they train for war. And each of them will sit under his vine And under his fig tree, With no one to make them afraid, For the mouth of the LORD of hosts has spoken. Though all the peoples walk Each in the name of his god, As for us, we will walk In the name of the LORD our God forever and ever.  ‘In that day,’ declares the LORD, ‘I will assemble the lame, And gather the outcasts, Even those whom I have afflicted. I will make the lame a remnant, And the outcasts a strong nation, And the LORD will reign over them in Mount Zion From now on and forever.'”

The assumption is that this promise in Micah is a reference to the millennial kingdom. However, we can’t find a millennial kingdom in the Bible but only an idiomatic idea of a millenial kingdom. The idiomatic idea of the millennial kingdom comes from one of the shortest verses in an apocalyptic address, from an ambiguous section of a single sentence that reads, “and they came to life and reigned with Christ for a thousand years.” This is interpreted to mean that there will be a kingdom of Christ that lasts for a thousand years. But look at the very next sentences. “The rest of the dead did not come to life until the thousand years were completed. This is the first resurrection.” The dogmatic dispensationalists postulate that the “rest of the dead,” refer to the Old Testament Saints but either way you slice it, that explanation falls short. Jesus argued with the leaders of Israel; “‘Truly, truly, I say to you, if anyone keeps My word he shall never see death.’ The Jews said to Him, ‘Now we know that You have a demon. Abraham died, and the prophets also; and You say, “If anyone keeps My word, he shall never taste of death.” Surely You are not greater than our father Abraham, who died? The prophets died too; whom do You make Yourself out to be?’ Jesus answered, ‘If I glorify Myself, My glory is nothing; it is My Father who glorifies Me, of whom you say, “He is our God;” and you have not come to know Him, but I know Him; and if I say that I do not know Him, I shall be a liar like you, but I do know Him, and keep His word. Your father Abraham rejoiced to see My day, and he saw it and was glad.’ The Jews therefore said to Him, ‘You are not yet fifty years old, and have You seen Abraham?’ Jesus said to them, ‘Truly, truly, I say to you, before Abraham was born, I am.'” Jesus also said to the Sadducees, The God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob is the God of the living not the dead. Yet Paul writes; “The last enemy that will be abolished is death. For HE HAS PUT ALL THINGS IN SUBJECTION UNDER HIS FEET. But when He says, ‘All things are put in subjection,’ it is evident that He is excepted who put all things in subjection to Him. And when all things are subjected to Him, then the Son Himself also will be subjected to the One who subjected all things to Him, that God may be all in all.” Don’t be confused I am not contradicting the context; clearly the Bible describes two resurrections of all. The first is found in death and the resurrection of the soul or spirit and then the resurrection of the body. But the dogmatic dispensationalists argue against two resurrections and for three, at minimum. This is clearly against the context of 1 Corinthians 15 and all that Jesus taught and all that the prophets said. The rapture of the church and the millenial kingdom are talking points and ideas but are not necessarily actual doctrines but rather dubious dogma.

Therefore when we read Micah four, we suspend our preconceived notions about a millennial kingdom and carefully consider the context and explore examples. For instance we read; “For from Zion will go forth the law, Even the word of the LORD from Jerusalem.” Isaiah reads; For the law will go forth from Zion, And the word of the LORD from Jerusalem.” Notice that they are almost identical and remember that the Spirit inspired the writings and that the Spirit inspired Paul, Peter and the author of Hebrews and that they read Isaiah and Micah. Also remember that they all used the term “the last days” and the New Testament writers refered to their generation while the Old Testament writers pointed forward. Without jumping to any conclusions we keep considering the context and examine examples. “‘In that day,’ declares the LORD, ‘I will assemble the lame, And gather the outcasts, Even those whom I have afflicted.'” Matthew tells us a similar story: “Now when John in prison heard of the works of Christ, he sent word by his disciples, and said to Him, ‘Are You the Expected One, or shall we look for someone else?’ And Jesus answered and said to them, ‘Go and report to John what you hear and see: the BLIND RECEIVE SIGHT and the lame walk, the lepers are cleansed and the deaf hear, and the dead are raised up, and the POOR HAVE THE GOSPEL PREACHED TO THEM. And blessed is he who keeps from stumbling over Me.'” Twice Jesus quotes Isaiah, the contemporary of Micah. Do we see a sublime string or is it cut off, like the Messiah, stopping the prophetic clock.

The problem is that we see in both Micah and Isaiah, one of the most familiar sayings from the Bible which has the appearance of a far-future time. “Then they will hammer their swords into plowshares And their spears into pruning hooks; Nation will not lift up sword against nation, And never again will they train for war.” Micah and Isaiah cannot be speaking about Christ’s incarnation because we still see swords and spears, war and death. But this is an apocalyptic address and “then” means after these things. And the truth is that we really don’t see swords much anymore and plowshares are dying off too. We have to see the sublime string.

“And the LORD will reign over them in Mount Zion From now on and forever. And as for you, tower of the flock, Hill of the daughter of Zion, To you it will come— Even the former dominion will come, The kingdom of the daughter of Jerusalem. Now, why do you cry out loudly? Is there no king among you, Or has your counselor perished, That agony has gripped you like a woman in childbirth? Writhe and labor to give birth, Daughter of Zion, Like a woman in childbirth, For now you will go out of the city, Dwell in the field, And go to Babylon. There you will be rescued; There the LORD will redeem you From the hand of your enemies. And now many nations have been assembled against you Who say, ‘Let her be polluted, And let our eyes gloat over Zion.’ But they do not know the thoughts of the LORD, And they do not understand His purpose; For He has gathered them like sheaves to the threshing floor. Arise and thresh, daughter of Zion, For your horn I will make iron And your hoofs I will make bronze, That you may pulverize many peoples, That you may devote to the LORD their unjust gain And their wealth to the Lord of all the earth.” Never forget that this is an apocalyptic address.

Lord willing we will return to this in the next missive. For now I have a joke of which I want to remind you because we have all heard it or a variation of it. A man goes to the doctor and says, “doctor, it hurts when I do this.” The doctor replies, “then don’t do that.” In a similar manner we read about a millennial kingdom in Micah because we are doing something we shouldn’t do, relying on idiomatic ideas rather than an exegesis of apocalyptic addresses. The NBA is brilliant, corrupt but brilliant. Canceling the remainder of the season makes them the heroes of Covid19, Novel Virus. If it is a devastating disaster, they can say, “we tried to help.” But even better, when it fizzles from feigned frenzy, they can say, “We were the first; we helped stop the spread of this virus.” My wife has a saying; “I never been sick but when I am, a shot of whiskey and a shot of lemon juice knocks it right out.” Of course I ask her how she knows this if she’s never been sick; but the point is, it is like the man who goes to great lengths to keep alligators away from his house only to be informed by his neighbor that alligators don’t live in their region. To which the man replies, “see, it’s working.” As my wife wouldn’t know what makes her well if she’s never been sick, and like the man who thinks he’s keeping cold-blooded alligators away from Greenland, we can’t jump to conclusions based upon idiomatic ideas. I can’t say at this point in Micah that he is speaking about the first coming of Jesus. The prophecy pundits also cannot say that this is in reference to a millennial kingdom after a bodily resurrection of a rapture and time of tribulation, in which people die. We have to consider the continuing context and explore examples. And when we do, Lord willing, we will see that this is indeed the first coming of Christ–I read ahead.

The dogmatic dispensationalists are not like the NBA although they attempt it–to cover themselves as far as specific dates are concerned. However, according to their dubious dogma the prophetic clock restated in 1948. This means that the generation alive at that moment, will see the rapture. First, a generation was 40 years but when the rapture did not happen, the duration of a generation became 70 years. But that came and went like the blood moons. Now a generation is 100; scratch that; 120 years. Fine by me–to those reading this in 2049, they were wrong; weren’t they?

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